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to put on events like this that add to the cultural life that we all enjoy in this great city. so so thanks to them. [applause] and in a way that's what we're here to talk about this afternoon, the triumph of this city and all the cities, the triumph of the city, that's the title of harvard economics professor ed glaeser's book. it's about what's made cities around the world great, about the challenges that they have had to overcome and still face. we're going to talk about b that in a few minutes in the special context of this city with our panel, and we'll take questions from you as well later. but, first, to launch us off with a presentation, here's the author, professor ed glaeser. [applause] >> thank you. thank you, bob. and thank you all so much for being here. i'm so enormously flattered that you've decided to take time out of your saturday afternoon to come and talk about, about cities. i'm also particularly grateful to the boston book festival for including this book. i, like i think every single one of you, love books, and i'm just thrilled to be part of this amazing thing
ways in the first beta of hippies that came to the city really have the drawbridge pulled up on them. many of the kids can get treatment with a drug problems and other medical problems. they were given the cold shoulder by the city officials, the cops harassed them. so that was only the beginning of what became the very first culture were anything great here in san francisco. america's first culture where was the civil work in the disco is of between these new forces, social forces that began sweeping the city in the 1960s and 1970s with gays. one step work really took hold, and became quite bloody. i written about the so-called san francisco values weren't born with flowers in their hair. they were born howling. the book i should say does have a happy ending because the city ultimately trying triads. it resolves these differences after very brutal times and with the help of then mayor who is not terribly beloved in the city at first couldn't win the office because she was a little straightlaced received cisco, diane find time. but she was the kind of calm in hand and stable politica
thought, that is such a poetic thing. the city had burned down 16 times by an arsonist. and i thought, who is this that? so basically i am a true crime writer. and then i found out one of these firemen, it was tom sawyer robinson, i think it is, that he had run with the very first volunteer fire department in california. back in new york where tom was a torch boy, he had been in competition with broderick. when he came west to make his fortune, he basically wanted to be a senator. tom came along and an assortment of the weirdest guys you ever saw -- heavyweight champs, gunslingers, con men, absolutely amazing people. and we are very close to it. that tom sawyer actually met him in may of 19 -- 1863. mark twain like to talk to tom because tom knew great stories. all these little little bits and pieces and stories, that is how long it took, 15 years. can you imagine? i do love it. it is so fun. i guess i could read you some now if you would like. this may take a second. i have never read in public before. so i will start with a quote from tom sawyer. here it is. if you want to know how to i
in the 1970s in "season of the witch: enchantment, terror and deliverance in the city of love." in "quiet: the power of introverts in a world that can't stop talking," author susan cain examines the benefits of an introverted personality. david drayly looks at 1862 and the actions of abraham lincoln in "rise to greatness: abraham lincoln's most perilous year." and in "full body burden: growing up in the nuclear shadow of rocky flats," kristin iverson investigates the nuclear weapons plant that was located near her childhood home. for an extended list of links to various publications' book selections, visit booktv's web site, booktv.org or facebook.com/booktv. >> and another update from capitol hill as reporters wait here for word from lawmakerrers in closed-door meetings on the fiscal cliff. an update via twitter from chad pilgrim of fox news, reid's remark that he had made a counteroffer was off-the-cuff response and that there was no counteroffer, and "the washington post" quoting senator joe lieberman saying he'd be shocked if a deal was struck today. we'll bring you continuing updates
people. can you talk a little bit about how that works in a city? >> yeah. well, first of all, i've had lots of conversations with people who, quote-unquote, have made it, and when they were in tough times from famous people like tyler perry who was homeless, living in a car, to people i know throughout my community who have got, broken drug addictions, who have dealt with brutal, brutal hatred because they came out of the closet at a young age. all these stories. and it's amazing to me that everybody, including tyler perry, has these stories about how one perp's small act of -- one person's small act of kindness was a difference maker for them. and it gives me chills to think that the biggest thing we actually do on any given day probably could be a small act of kindness to someone else. and so the vulnerability and fragility of life you really get to see up close and personal in cities like ours here in new york and ours in newark, new jersey, and how it doesn't take that much effort to be there for a kid. and i see, and i was very happy during sandy, we were able to do some things th
and join the peace corps, volunteered in the inner city or in outer space because he asked them to give back to this country that has given us all so much. generation inspired has passed that commitment on to their children and grandchildren in the continuity of spirit that continues to work for a more just and peaceful world. as we approached the 50th anniversary, my family thought a good deal about how to best celebrate my father service and patriotism. we recognize that his time is becoming part of history. not living memory. that brings opportunities as well as challenges. both my parents loved history and and they pass it on to me to my brother, john. my father read voraciously about the civil war, english parliamentary history and the world wars of the 20th century. my mother preferred the ancient world in 18th century europe. for them come in the past was not a tie and a welfare. but full of exciting people, rate heroes and heroines, and defense that could teach us a great deal about our own times. here at the library we decided to concentrate on making history of the kennedy adm
of poetry. [laughter] we do have differences. i am from kansas city which during my childhood was known in as the gateway to the west. he was from st. louis and the government builds the arch okhotsk and proclaimed themselves gateway to the west and we called them mound city. we think of st. louis as the exit to the east of. [laughter] there's similarities between t.s. eliot and me. we both use foreign languages in our poetry. he tends to use more sanskrit. actually don't know much of it. i was a kid who'd got dreamy during sanskrit class in kansas city, missouri. [laughter] to look out the window. i use some yiddish. [laughter] it is fair to say that t.s. eliot was not partial to yiddish. my shortest poem uses yiddish. it was called something like this societal political and philosophical implications of the o.j. simpson trial. the title does not count. the plan was o.j. or a vague [laughter] -o.j. oi vey and then -- we both use a little german when george w. bush appointed a retainer that rhymed roberto gonzales. we both cried about animals and he famously wrote a lot of things abou
of the main part of the cities. >> professor haddad, who are some of the players that we might not have heard of thomas some of the large business leaders in syria? and what role are they playing in the current crisis in serious? >> well if you know, the conquest -- probably a different trajectory at some level, especially after the first few months. it became a totally different kind of thing. it started out as resentment and rebellion against -- >> economic resentment? >> it was makes. it was really problematic to look at the arab uprising and pin it down on one thing because we were talking about several decades of a particular kind of system that was politically inefficient and definitely undemocratic. so economically efficient early on, they're gone but then actually declined and became quite problematic in terms of gaps between the haves and the have-nots. but all of these systems, all of these reasons combined together to create a readiness to act. and the assad regime, they don't act unless there might be a positive outcome but at least not -- [inaudible]. when that movement took plac
. it was a big story. thiokol my staff. guess what i am doing? but it was a powerful thing. one of 14 cities in america with a food policy director and we had done a lot of work when trying to expand affordable health options. i said this is a great thing. we could not only raise levels of compassion and understanding and dispel that stereotypes about snap and things that are on snap and focusing ted -- focus instead on changes week could be making an t mobile level to address food and security and nutrition and expand more healthy options. that is what we are doing this week. we also have to think of our society as a whole. and security guards in my office, we were talking with them because some of them were making $7 and change and many working overtime to make more money to solve problems like snap, we are allowing many of our employees especially behind the curtains. the curtains blocked the sex and love section. it is like in 711, the line across the magazine's. you guys should put your book on the second aisle. >> we should have called it 50 shades of homelessness. >> it would have sol
later. nothing could out do the flurry of excitement that hetty encountered the fall of 1860. this city shimmered with the news as the prince of wales was coming. a group of leading citizens was organizing a ball. society trimmed their moustaches women spent hours and at 9:00 p.m. friday october 12th couples who had paid $10 apiece arrived at the academy of music. men with white ties and women with hoopskirt its with brocade, sat tin, lead tools, gave special nods to precisely at 10:00 p.m. the orchestra played god save the queen and the small prints stepped into the room. nearly 3,000 of new york's finest citizens rushed to meet him and with the rash the wooden floor collapsed. the band played furiously the aghast rushed to follow they had lobster salad, pat day and filled glasses with champagne. at 2:00 with their dance floor fixed eager females waited their turn for a dance and finally the young woman was tapped. stunning in her low cut white gown with pink and her arms covered with long white gloves with ostrich feathers, it hetty was introduced to the prince of wales. and she said
he something like that that inner-city when you are living in a tent. there is something like 74,000 acres of land we are still going dealing with a very urgent and difficult situation in haiti. >> host: where did your book, "so spoke the earth" come from? >> guest: it came from women writers of haitian descent. it is the navigation of patients to tell their stories and these groups of women, the edited this anthology. it is "so spoke the earth: the haiti i knew, the haiti i know, the haiti i want to know." different women talk about this. it is a trilingual anthology in english, french, and creole. it's generational. we talk about the people who were surviving it. we talk about their friends and neighbors. there is an opportunity for people who don't know much about haiti to get to know katie through a variety of women writers wasted. >> host: is creole very different from french? >> guest: creel -- creole is a language of its own. it came from the french, spanish, english, all of these people came to haiti. and so creole is a very beautiful language. it is often maligned langua
you couldn't carry a gun around in the town like dodge city is a good example. there were walls against that. if you are a cowboy that came in when you were supposed to go story or pistol if you had one. >> host: that doesn't fit with the way that most people think about it. >> guest: this is of course settlements out in the wild prairie, but they are like towns everywhere today. you need to call and order in the towns and it's hard to keep that up. >> host: even the shootout at the corral was a starting point. >> guest: clams and i think it was had been arrested or accused of violating below will ordinance and forbade carrying a local firearm. incidentally the understanding of what gun rights were for beginning to evolve in the 19th century, and in particular in the south in the early 19th century it was a big problem with duals the most famous one is aaron burr and hamilton, but this was fairly common but it was frowned upon and it can be prosecuted and he had to keep moving around to avoid being prosecuted, so but one of the names of people who insisted on the spot started to
or -- >> guest: dodge city is a good example. there were laws against that. you had to deposit your arms. if you were a cowboy who came in from the plains there was place where you were supposed to store your pistol if you had one. >> host: that didn't fit with the way most people think about it. >> guest: this is in settlements. knotted out in the wild prairie. but they're like towns everywhere today. you need a little law and order in towns and it's hard to keep that up if erv is pull ought a pistol. >> host: even the shootout at the okay corral was gun control. >> guest: it started because of ike had been arrested or accused of violating the local ordinance that forbids carrying a firearm openly around town. >> host: incidentally, the understanding of what gun rights were for began to evolve in the 19th century in particular in the south. in the earl 19th century there was a big problem with duels. duels between gentlemen, obviously the most famous one is aaron burr and alexander hamilton. but this is dueling was fairly common, about it was frowned upon, and could be prosecuted, and had to ke
fractured civil war and the israeli incursion of 1982. the city was a mess. the school is under assault. he believed that going back and running the school and providing leadership at a time of crisis was the best thing to do for an institution that is loved and he gave his life to the school was assassinated in january of 9094. >> by who and how? >> most likely by the fanatical wing of hezbollah, a group known as islamist jihads the comprised lebanese shia who had historically been underprivileged, excluded from the politics and economics of the country, had ideological affinity for the regime in iran, from 1979 and have been radical in the israeli purge to lebanon in the 1980s. there is a very toxic mix that let them should make steps the climax of the assassination of malcolm kerr. >> was he targeted? >> because he was an american. not only american, but very visible presence in the middle east. there is no more high-profile example of america's involvement in the region in the presence of uav. >> this american university put in beirut on purpose? back in 1850s, what was beirut like? >>
a political battle we fought out but it's an urban area or city in the frontier trying to get its act together? >> guest: oddly, courts didn't have much to say except in state courts were for the most part are we going baystate and lower federal courts supported the right and saw it as not a rate that belonged to criminals are to be used for criminal purposes, but more as a write-in connection to civic duty. but the supreme court didn't say anything about the second amendment for about a century. they mentioned it briefly in a ruling in 1876 and that was u.s. versus cruickshank, which rose out of the horrible massacre, one of the worst in the reconstruction. , with the whole war, blacks had tried to defend themselves in louisiana and were attacked by white crowds and the federal government attempted to prosecute the attackers on the grounds that they had deprived the blacks who were killed -- >> host: mna type issue. >> guest: didn't find that was the case. at that time we don't see any racial motivation at all to deprive blacks of their very specifically. in a kind of a side, the ruling said
to the podium will be the mayor of fairfax city, race silverthorne houle introduced a nice case. we are going to keep things to a minimum and shift to formality staff. he's going to read, take questions from cars that some of you filled out an answer those and then read again. then we would do the presentation and then he will be done. bookstore will be open in the lobby if you haven't had a chance to buy one of the present looks. so here's the mayor. [applause] >> at evening, ladies and gentlemen and distinguished guests. it's been 15 years since the possibilities of the book festival at george mason university was first discussed. the city was one of the initial founders of the festival this protagonist order of the festival percents. in the past seven years, then stage and indirect fairfax or local businesses, old town hall county museum visitor center and the city of fairfax regional library. for the past two years are brand-new sherwood community center. were proud to strengthen the ties between the city of fairfax at george mason's fall for the book festival. it is now my distinct honor
so it is okay to run the power line through the state parks to get them to the city's whereas before this he couldn't even look at a state park was the idea of running power lines through it. without i'm going to turn this over to alex that will step us through the fallacies and the rise of the entire scientific left and we have time for q&a afterwards because i'm going to reach behind alex and popped him with a book if it runs too late. over to you and thanks for doing this. >> thanks for that kind introduction. so, i -- our book is "science left behind" and it's about the feel-good fallacies of their diet and the antiscientist left and as he said my name is alex and i got my ph.d. in microbiology from washington, and more importantly now the editor of nuclear science.com. so, just a little bit about my background entirely microbiology. in fact that's me. a friend of mine had become an ob/gyn so i look like a geek in that picture so i put there. that's me working in the chamber which you may have come across at one point. uigur left with extremely slowly bacteria. i went to the univ
price of $500 per person into have three wonderful days to bring in intellectual feast to of fun city to los vegas. >> what your background. >> i grew up in portland, oregon. i am an active mormon. and when on a mission for the mormon church. a graduate from byu and worked for the cia. then i broke out into the financial world. since then says they got married , five children to move to the mamas for two years, save enough money to move to the london worry butterfly and in pen to 71 countries. my primary source of income is my investment news article forecast of strategies that have written since 1980, but i also have 1 foot in the academic world. everett number of books on economics, @booktv and business, columbia university in new york and now mercy college. i should also mention my wife does the income from festival, so we have a film festival as well. a lot of things that we do and really enjoy it. >> what did you do for the cia? >> question. i was an economist on the brazil desk very much involved with commodities in the energy crisis in the 70's. the cia was just too bureaucrati
affordable housing and she's very well qualified. she began her career as a housing coordinator for the city of santa barbara, rising to become the city's housing and redevelopment manager. and i would point out, santa barbara is a magnificent part of my state. i have a beautiful state. and they didn't have much in the way of moderate income housing, and i think it was very important the work that she did. she moved on to eden housing, a nonprofit affordable housing developer, where she developed over 400 homes as a project manager. and she took over as executive director. later she joined bridge housing as vice president, and in 1996, she took the helm of that organization as its president and chief executive. bridge is the largest nonprofit developer of affordable mixed-income and mixed-use developments in california. and while she was there, carol oversaw the creation of over 13,000 affordable homes for more than 35,000 californians and programs that helped one-fourth of their residents advance to homeownership. because she knew that was the goal. homeownership even after all we've been t
, the city council of new york city had elections based on proportional representation so you would get a seat in the city council of new york if you got x% of the vote. if you got twice that you would get two seats which is how the following happened. amen named ben davis, benjamin davis won s c and city council of new york in the 1940s. you might be interested in two aspect of benjamin davis, city council member. he was black. he was an african-american and he was an enthusiastic public leader of the united states communist party and he was elected because of proportional representation. shortly after that proportional representation was ended. new democracy came in first, they had twenty-eight%. ari arizahad 24 or something close. under greek law whatever party comes in first gets not only the percentage of the popular vote that is won but an extra 50. that is the only reason there the government in greece now because they got it by this rule which is designed to favor the party that comes in first. you had a knife edge situation in greece. in addition to the sariza party their deep
without putting anything down. the city said you give you 1 acre of land for free to build a new home. of course, he relocated the property he did not have to pay for. he would of had to have the burden of every expense you would enter. this is the first mill skinner had it went up six months to the day of the flood. in holyoke. and ultimately skinners mill turned into that. the largest silk mill under one roof in the world. 1874, a success of this scope was impossible to imagine. and what what it would take to achieve that. 1874, skinner thought he was the head of his game. 49 years old, a wife, seven children, a village of 200 growing up around his mill, the head of the american soap trade, bullish on the pgm believed silk would become big business. it did. 87 before he thought how can i expand my business today? he would say what is the biggest room in the world? the room for improvement with 1874 he was looking to improve the business bullish on the future looking ahead. how could he become even better? with that i will read an excerpt from the book that i will take questions. i a
plantation. there were no villages and towns and cities in the north. in the north people could free slaves with opportunities in manufacturing where they could learn skills and trades. couldn't do that in the south. the only opportunity for work or for field hands and when the cotton gin was invented, and that absorbed all the slaves unskilled laborer and you now have i plantation owner, this rather cruel lower middle income people buying property in planting cotton prior to that, most of the poor whites in the south were against slavery because the slaves competed with them for jobs. but unlike most politicians come he put his political career on the line in favor of abolition. >> he was the first to stand up and he led the fight turned his congressional career, which really began after his presidency. he failed to be really did to the presidency. you brought this up before because he didn't have the common touch. he believed it was the need for dignity of a presidential candidate to go stumping out in the countryside and make promises to people he knew he couldn't keep and unfortunately
places? >> i prefer to visit any place i write. "winter of the world" takes place in cities that are familiar to me. london, washington, berlin. event is petersburg into moscow. but a few places i haven't visited us got a chapter about the development of the atom bomb and a lot of that took place in new mexico and in particular was very exciting true story of espionage down in new mexico. santa fe apparently is crawling with fbi agents. everybody knew because they were all wearing tweed jackets. but anyway, there is some serious s. ganache going on, so that's great drama for me. so i just like to walk around the streets. i find that very helpful. >> i wondered when i came to the mirrors entry materials and buffalo issue actually went to buffalo. >> i went a couple of times to buffalo. the other thing is buffalo features than 100 years ago was a very different place from what it's like today. nevertheless i went there in the round, but i got a hold of old maps and the buffalo bluebook, which was the list of high society in town and at newspapers published at the time and so o
. so they did was to work with u.s. army soldiers in the areas in and around the city of kandahar. it was this tale of our own services fighting with each other instead of fighting in common purpose against the enemy. and the stories go on. there was into fighting then the state department, within the u.s. agency for international development. and one other tale, i recount in some detail in the book, we had some real serious in fighting between president own national security team and senior people at the state department, over the whole question of what is it wise to try to broach potential peace talks with the taliban. we wound up spending 18 months fighting with one another in washington as opposed to uniting a common person to try to achieve the present school in the country. >> who is summer? >> so, she is a young american woman who come and there she is on the bottom right, who had extensive foreign development experience and put her hand up to go to afghanistan. to try to rebuild the country, to work with u.s. agency for international development. she thought she would be o
delivers the 22 manhattan institute lecture at the plaza hotel in new york city. it's a little over one hour. [applause] >> what a magnificent introduction. thank you to all of you here tonight. as thinking about a friend of mine, rest in peace, and harold when he accepted the nobel prize he wrote a rather scathing indictment of the west. i thought back to the time i was making a movie with harold and we were shooting in a white truffle chapel in a jewish neighborhood and he started reminiscing about his life when growing up over his uncle's radio shop -- he was reminiscing over growing up over his uncle's radio shop in the jewish area chapel and his magnificent radio actor voice became skittish to 1938 and his face lit up remembering those days growing up in the warmth of the jewish ghetto of london and i thought how could harold pinter done a great the west ha when if it weren't for the united states a free of virtue in london have been killed. i felt i was kind of odd coming in miles from rendering the intersection and the cultural upbringing and then i remembered thinking when harol
-ridiculous and i'll begin with ridiculous. there is a relatively new mall outside of the old city called the manila mall and i gather at one point you were trying to buy some cosmetics there in a shop and you couldn't get any attention because the jewish saleswoman and the arab customer were deeply engaged in a very long discussion. >> eyeshadow. whether it should be frosted or whether it should match the headscarf or not match the headscarf and seriously, i went from there to lunch and i thought i was meeting a jewish friend and we were going to sit at a table overlooking the city. an arab family came in ahead of us and next to us was an orthodox jewish family, sitting and we were trying to get a table, which we finally did that the entire app is fair is like nobody's paying attention. everybody is saying what they are everybody of course, secular jews don't stress noticeably different than anybody else. >> american tourists do. describe the american tourist. >> well, little fanny packs. most of them are over 60 and have backpacks and that is how they describe them. it's so mixed and nobody is pay
, well villager compound in kendu bay, probably an hour and a half from the city of consumer -- kisumu. it now had a cement floor but we were told would obama's slept they are there was no cement, just rolled much. and he spent two nights there. when he was visiting that area, that part of the obama clan on his journey through africa, his first ever trip there. just to think, it's not like, it has nothing to do with how i feel about obama. and really, i don't approach the book that way anywhere. is just the main character of my book. and has nothing to do what i like him or dislike him. it has to do with the history of seeing this little place, before anybody, anybody knew who the hell barack obama was. you know, he was 26 years old, making that first journey back to a land that he had never seen before. and i was looking at this little hut on the floor where he slept of those nights back in 1987, and just kind of come it didn't overwhelm the but it made me realize that, to see history as so much more powerful than just sort of think about it or read about it. i mean, i'll be able to p
to say the same people. i have tried to say it over the years and i think in the city, people have dismissed as well, you are being a pollyanna or something like that, but i still say it's all the people who never gave up and had every reason to. first in that line would be people like my grandparents. not the cynical people that these unlettered people who never ever quit, who got up every day and believe that even if they didn't make it, those who came after them would. it's almost as though they self sacrificed. they were self-sacrificing, offering for these two boys and the generations to come afterwards. so you know, people say you haven't, i haven't done this or that. you know, i think you and i both have people who gave the last full measure for us and many many ways. so i can't really take too many bows for that. >> there is so much there and over the course of our conversation i hope to reach the declaration of the independence and the last full measure, "the gettysburg address." you mentioned who was then and who wasn't, we and how that changed over time. ike just want to
at columbia. his first night in new york city -- where did he spend a? >> guest: is very dubious about this in my book, but he -- he couldn't get into his apartment. he couldn't get the key of the sublet of the front of his mother's. so he slept outside of his suitcase. he said he had called and came over there the next morning. >> host: genevieve makes the scene in new york city. who is that? >> guest: genevieve cook is an australian who's mother had a second marriage to a notable american, so the family kind of had american ties. she came to new york city and met barack obama after he graduated columbia. they had a lot in common from the moment they met. they both had indonesian connections. the father and mother had lived in indonesia. he was a diplomat. and so she had lived there. her family was in the upper crust. and so she and barry both have this connection -- the indonesian connections as well. [inaudible] a fabulous researcher at "the washington post" and gabriel banks. eventually i found her and i can tell all that story because not because of the book but because of she had
originally came from china. the city was the wartime capital of china. that's for all the major players in the book stay, and so since my childhood, i was intrigued by a lot of things. the oss was the wartime intelligence office. the reason why i couldn't write a book like this was because a late 1980s, bill casey who was the president of ronald reagan's cia director, he was also a history buff, decided to want to open up all the oss operation files. no one in the world had done it. you open up your own intelligence days of the entire operation file. that's amazing. so now it's at the national archives in college park, maryland. it's a gigantic record file. it has about 8000 feet of files. so i delved into this and i found some of the fascinating stuff. so i decided to write the book, and the book was first published in 1997 on the 50th anniversary of the cia. so it sold relatively well, and then 9/11 happened, and interesting intelligence organization, but then people were overwhelmingly interested, here now, and more internal affairs stuff. so a few years later, this one, this topic b
is jefferson sent missionary to france to buy the louisiana territory. he didn't he sent them to buy the city of new orleans from fraps. the louisiana territory as a whole was not mentioned by anyone in the united states as even a possibility. so they traveled across the atlantic and lands in france and starts traveling toward paris. and before he arrives in paris, the american ambassador who was already there robert living stone approached who is that poll yon's foreign minister and said how would you like to boy the interterritory of louisiana. it's not vising living stone said yes. let's do it. they negotiate and they arrive and they complete the negotiations. they are -- james monroe. who would become marylandson's secretary of state and would then become's madison's suck receiver as president. we have a bunch of people who would be president almost president, evaluated. mob row and living stone complete the negotiation. they are not difficult. the french want to sell. they bigger problems with the britain. >> host: they want the cash. in louisiana they decided is a write off. >> that pol
of richmond hill and outlying city of savannah and their great army bases of ft. stewart and hunter army airfield and the savannah aircard have helped me heal by supporting the matthew freeman project and our annual veterans day captain matthew freeman 5k run for piece. last night i dedicated a memorial in our town to captain matthew freeman project proudly announced a new scholarship that we will be starting for the siblings of the fallen in combat. these are the forgotten mourners who often sacrifice and postpone their education to comfort family or deal with their own grief. after 11 years at war very few people know about goldstar families. these are parents, siblings, thousands of children who survived the death of their loved one. as a mother of a fallen marine, i'm sure we are all ready for this war to end and bring our loved ones home. i encourage all to learn more about helping goldstar families. i humbly request a media report our military to humanitarian efforts in war-torn countries. our men and women are working for peace, not war. this generation of grandchildren, the great
an independent freeport, like the city of hamburg in what is now germany. out in the midwest, they were more closely connected to new orleans then to new england. their farm produce went right down mississippi and out to the world through new orleans. they would have been happy to break away from those strange prudish puritanical prigs in massachusetts. what about texas? texas has always wanted to be its own country and it still does. they weren't going to stay in the confederacy. what about california, which in those days before the transcontinental railroad created in 1862, before the railroad, california to the united states. people walking alongside, people sailing for weeks and months around the southern tip of south america. california was eager to go its own way. secession in other words was a tiger that might bite in any direction. andrew johnson of tennessee, great unionist southerner, put it this way. if there is one division of the state, will there not be more than one? wouldn't north america soon be just as fragmented and war prone as europe lacks 33 petty governments, a little
conversations] >> we continue our live coverage from the national book awards here in new york city. this is one of the nominated books. "the boy kings of texas. " a memoir. domingo martinez is the awe their. mr. martinez now joins us here on the red carpet. this is your story. is that correct? >> it's primarily my story but it's also the story of my family. i go back one generation more and discuss my grandmother's mythology, how she came over to america, and how ultimately her coming across from mexico into america, that sort of spawned this fantastic first generation american story. >> mr. martinez, you were raised in brownsville, texas, right on the border, what was it like during your childhood? >> back then i experienced it as being racially polarized, in a more economic sort of striation, and was very agriculturally based. my parents ran a trucking business that sort of -- basically farm laborers, so kind of a conflicted experience because we would go to school and pretend like we were wealthier than we were, and entirely different, the people who we really are or were, and then we would
to be here. as i tell my history students, i teach at the city university of new york in the ph.d. program -- [applause] >> thank you. [laughter] as i tell my history students until they wallet to choke me, the -- they want to choke me, the past is a foreign country. we can visit there, try to learn the customs, translate the language, feel the air and the light, sniff the fragrances, recoil at the foul odors, but we are foreigners in a strange land. this is true as much of the recent past as it is of colonial america or 12th century venice. writing about the recent past is not easy, as i learned this time around. first, there are people you have to talk to. [laughter] and while i was blessed from beginning to end by having some fascinating people to talk to about joe kennedy including large numbers of kennedys, i much prefer working from written documents to listening to people talk and trying to figure out what's real, what's imagined, what they know, what they think they know because someone told them, what they think they know but they don't know at all. the other difficulty about writ
honor to be at politics and prose, such an institution to the city, and it's really a pleasure to be here. thank you to everyone for coming out on an august evening to hear me. i will try to be brief in my comments, and i would rather have more of an exchange of ideas and hear your perspective and so that we can have a conversation about manufacturing and what our country should do to be competitive. the book, the idea for the book came above when i was traveling around the country, and i would go, and i would see a successful manufacturer making blenders, making steel, making fire stones, making meats, and food, and i would say, you know, i thought all of our manufacturing had gone offshore, something didn't make sense. i started to wonder what were people missing in this story? it turns out that while a lot of consumer manufacturing has gone offshore, so if you go into a store, the toys there, apparel there, a lot of that has left america. we still are a world leader when it comes to complex, advanced manufacturing. we make almost 80% of our steel here. we make tremendous amo
a nuclear bomb in new york city or something like that. it is very compelling. well, the argument is that if you use racial determination for college admissions, it is likely that there will be somewhat more -- somewhat more of unrehearsed, interracial conversations are in especially among students. under the african-american kids and a latino kids who get these preferences -- they will say something to the white kids and asian kids that have overwhelming compelling educational benefits for them. that is a argument that the university of texas is arguing. that is an exception of non-discrimination that the supreme court has recognized. okay? okay. i think that's ridiculous. and, indeed, the reason the court buys this is because there are social sciences out there and scientists who say this is true. now, increasingly, these educational benefits, which, you know, make only marginal improvements to education access, they are disputed. you know, it is increasingly disputed that their are any educational benefits. but i think it is also important for the court to bear in mind, and i t
gather to watch and other places as well. in times square in the new york city and classrooms around the country in paris and iraq and afghanistan people are watching the u.s. presidential inauguration. they've all come there and there is a big crowd on the mall. i'm going to speak to you today about this great historic subject come of this institution and i am not -- i'm going to do it in the same way in which organized the book. rather the book is not chronological. it's not divided that starts off with george washington and then john adams to going to the president. instead it is divided by the various parts of the day and then i sprinkle vignettes. some of them very serious, some of them of course very traditional, and a lot of them i'm always looking for those, too. i also going to cover some things we are not going to see it coming inauguration in january because this time we do not have a change of power. as we are not going to have that transition as we see sometimes. but nevertheless in the morning at inauguration when a president does the office come here is a 1961 dwight e
lowered to half mast. church bells are starting to john. new york city lights have been turned on to the theater, the marquee and times square, one by one the lights go off. traffic. somebody hears it and stopped his car, behind they start to beat and someone comes out and they ask, he tells what happened and the news circulates from car to car, traffic comes to a hot dog peddler and he is sitting on a curb on broadway and someone gets out and says is it true? he says yes, he is dead. on fifth avenue, shop windows, salespeople come out in one store after another, taking the mannequins output in a photograph of president kennedy there. the church bells start to charm over the city. on the plane, there are three compartments. interfirst sits the press and staff and kennedy's secretaries are sitting there sobbing. in the last compartment jacqueline kennedy is sitting next to her husband. in the center compartment where lyndon johnson is sitting in the president's share there is an air -- we know what he is planning because he is making a list on little note pad on air force one th
, the first lady's great-grandmother who traveled to four cities, she was a sharecropper's daughter born in 1879 and somewhere along the way she decided she did not want anything to do with the farming life and she was one of the first of michele obama's and sisters to set site on chicago in 1908. this is her husband who was a minister who also lived in chicago. this is the first lady's great great grandmother, and she arrived in illinois some time in the 1860s. the first lady describes herself as a south side girl but the family had no idea their roots in illinois go that far back. if you look at mary, you will understand why the family story says she was part cherokee. she obviously has a mixed lineage but i was never able to establish for sure whether that was true. this is the first lady's grandfather, a mislabeled slide, who left south carolina and arrive in chicago around 1931. this is millvinia, the owner of millvinia's brother. this is a photo, this is an amazing coat, there is a nice story behind this one. after the book was published and after an article about the book came out
to approach the embattled city. i would spend the night looking over the wreckage while we waited for a vehicle to come. there were too many memorial ceremonies and i attended them all. on the night of a holy day i could hear the broadcast praying and of voice spread out the they could not interpret the feel that i may understand that is why a the randomness blind to the world as we see it to recognize what is solid and what is not it is the same world to mend. they hunt insects and hunt each other everything is similar and moving through the dark with a night vision goggles and was out all day on patrol thinking it would not need them. but you always bring all of your gear not knowing how the day would and. there is no depth perception he cannot see the dust but you know, it is there. the phosphorus burn and the tracers are to bright banners:as fast as they pass you order the family into the room be few but you're out of water for crow then they hurled themselves someone is shooting for but he may be there all night to. you may be there for the rest of your life. you don't know
to have this problem and when you dig this city about of the earth, you know, the size of the city and begin around and you have an enormous amount of our being hit by rain and leading off and that's called acid mining runoff and that is the problem. the problem is a mountain. how do you -- let's say you can contain a around it. it's when to go down into the aquifer unless you put something they don't know how to make which is like a giant t.a.r.p. for instance. they don't know how to do that. it's too big. so the only solution is in the only solution they are going to do, to put it back in the hole. it takes 25 years to get this mountain made. they are not good spent 25 years for free putting it back in the hole. so you basically have this huge mountain, they have about nine of them where they are just sitting there, they've been sitting there for 50, 70 years leeching off a lot of the heavy metals. the way to solve it, the only answer they have is to do what is called the cap and they put a two to five to 7 feet topsoil on because if you can stop it from catching basically a year
-old in a steel town to the atlantic coast. the city is a desert and the wasteland. your bar mitzvah is coming out. and you are avoiding the huge confession. one that will utterly change your life. a confession about one of the biggest superstars of history. that would be god. you are not a popular kid. other kids ignore you or try with all their might to keep you from getting anywhere near their backyard in their baseball diamonds and their clubs and their parties. when they do pay attention to, is to take aim. they kick soccer balls in your face. they grab your hat and tossed it over your head while you run back and forth. order required textbooks from your arms and threw them on the lawn covered with droppings. it haunts you. on saturday afternoon when you were 10, you were sitting in your families dark living room with a velvet curtain and you discover a book. it is about dedman, and dead that men have no choice. the two curios that you talk about in the book are galileo and the inventor of the microscope. even then, roughly 300 years ago. but they put you on a quest, an adventure that will la
was the arrest and roughing up of the 15 school age children, teenagers, in the southern city of duras in syria. that touched a nerve. that sort of thing happened in syria quite a bit over the years, but in the new circumstances of the arab spring, and the regime didn't under the new circumstances -- it just grew and grew and grew after that. and it unleashed -- i think this pentup frustration, especially among an empowered and energized and largely disenfranchised youth, especially with the help of the new social instrument of the social media, and the regime was totally caught offguard. they didn't realize that syria had been suffering from many of the same socioeconomic and political problems as many of these other countries. the growth rates, one of the highest in the world. the 60% of the population under the age of 25. general unemployment at 25% countrywide, who is a low figure. and higher, over 50-60% among males and females age 25 and younger. and you look at any country in the arab world experiencing the arab spring and these are similar numbers to what i just described. so, there wer
interact with it, the windy city and delete these representations communicate meaning to us. so let me say a few things. i will volunteer a few of my observations about what is striking about this photograph. one of them is the beauty of the subjects term is not just talking about the americas, which are gorgeous. and talking about the energy. there's a beautiful energy. there's the light. the humor. the lighting is not perfect, but the woman in the red, but with the way flowers is turned to her left in the look of what can only be described as gleeful amusement. obviously something very funny headset in this photo was snapped in this group of women. delay, humor, playfulness and the interactions of the screw. this is unusual. but we are accustomed to seeing his images in dreariness, bleakness, depictions that on the surface communicate injustice. if you are familiar, toyota to miyake's photograph of three boys advance in our stand to end looking wistfully across a barbed wire fence come a black-and-white image. that's the classic image of japanese-american incarceration. this is something
'm not a marxist, but class wise. and it's very true. i remember growing up in chandler, arizona, a city of about 12,000. and my dad was a ranch foreman on a cattle ranch. didn't make a ton of money, and yet somehow he provided for my mother, my college education, insurance. i don't know how he did it. but i looked across the street at another very middle class family. i looked across the street diagonally, and one of the richest families in chandler lived there, and the lot next to them was their pool and their poolhouse. who's a guest at their pool every single week? me. who plays monopoly with their kids? me. you don't see that much anymore. the superzips, as murray calls them, are highly i insulated and rarely get middle america at all in terms of entertainment, culturally, it's just a terrible split. and that is something we have to repair. >> [inaudible] >> matt flynn, charles koch foundation. when you say that it's something we need to repair, what would you prescribe to be a fix for that? isn't that undermining the idea of spontaneous order? >> no. i think that all order has certain const
. first san francisco and then in a little town called redwood city, a few miles from stanford--i would claim that as my childhood home. c-span: and where did you get your undergraduate degree? >> guest: spelman college in atlanta and... c-span: in what subject? >> guest: in political science. and my master's and phd from harvard. c-span: and where are you getting your interest in political science along the way? where did it come from? >> guest: probably having parents that were civil rights activists in the '60s in the bay area. that was probably my initial interest. i saw their activism, and that was important. but also, i think i became interested in international affairs at spelman, in particular for s--from some courses that i took, and then harvard was a wonderful place to study international relations. the end of the cold war story became important to me later on in my graduate career when i took a job, to the dismay of my dissertation adviser, to do the research for george shultz's memoir and--out at stanford. c-span: why--why to the dismay? >> guest: oh, because it was such a
of supervisors of the mayor or the city attorney are somebody and see what his job was like. and what a good thing that was. i remember that. and one of the reasons, architecture that i was in china, but one of the things i thought was great in architecture is in australia, they have changed now, but they built a parliament. and this parliament, whatever architecture reason, it goes up like this. it's huge, and the building goes down almost to the ground and it's covered with grass, the whole ceiling. so what the children, would come in droves in the buses and they would go to the top and they would go down like that. and i thought what a good idea. the association in their mind will be this democratic government of australia, and it has a place where i can go and roll downhill, so they'll have a positive association and it will make you more interested and they will learn about it. so i'm just pointing out there is no single technique, but ultimately it does depend on building the support for this idea. which means explain, which debating, which means discussing, which means the press event
. >> chicago was where it was all happening and you know, one of those big cities where people were trying to go to. one of the most fascinating record sources i found were these letters of migrants that one of the journalists covering -- collective. people in the 1900's who are looking for places and the "chicago defender," the black newspaper there played a big role in encouraging the migration and people wrote things like -- looking for a place, this kind of work or that kind of work and one of the letter said letters it struck me which i think i close with was, looking for a place where i can be a man or treated like a man. people thought that in this place it wasn't segregated. not like it was in the south. you could go to integrated schools and you could vote and you could make a real living wage. and there was a huge vibrant social, religious life there. no, i was going to say that when michelle obama's ancestors got there, the south side and she always says she is the south side girl and you are a cell site guy, it looks nothing like it did. her great-grandmother phebe moten johnso
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